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20190416

Spotkania z przedstawicielami School of Humanities at the University of Westminster

Data: 16.04.2019 - 17.04.2019
Spotkania z przedstawicielami School of Humanities at the University of Westminster

Katedra do Badań nad Przekładem i Komunikacją Międzykulturową zaprasza Pracowników i Studentów Wydziału Filologicznego na otwarte spotkania z przedstawicielami School of Humanities at the University of Westminster

 

 

 

VISIT TO JAGIELLONIAN UNIVERSITY

SUGGESTED PROGRAMME OF ACTIVITIES (15-17 April)

 

INFO FOR STUDENTS

 

Date: 9.00 – 11.00 a.m., Wednesday 17th April, 2019

Venue: Auditorium Maximum, Sala Seminaryjna A

 

  1. 1) PRESENTATION FOR STUDENTS (30 mins)

MA in Specialised Translation & MA in Translation and Interpreting at the University of Westminster, London (Overview on the courses + Q&A)

  1. 2) SEMINAR/WORKSHOP WITH STUDENTS                              

Title: Ideological issues in Translation

 

This workshop will analyse the impact that ideology has on the work of the translator. Particular attention will be paid to the way ideology shapes discourse and the way discourse practices reinforce or challenge ideologies. Using some practical examples exploring translation and gender and translation and postcolonialism, we will discuss ideological consequences of translator's choices as well as the role played by ideology in constructing and maintaining cultural knowledge across cultural barriers.

 

INFO FOR STAFF

 

Date: 4.30 – 6.30 p.m., Tuesday 16th April, 2019

Venue: Collegium Paderevianum, room 2, Al. Mickiewicza 9A

 

 

  1. 3) TRAINING WORKSHOP WITH RESEARCHERS  (1 h)

Title: How to Incorporate Assessment Literacy into Module Design and Delivery

Assessment is a crucial aspect of any module. However, assessment continues to be an aspect of their learning experience which students express most dissatisfaction with. The Higher Education Academy (HEA) has prioritised improvement in assessment practices and set out six tenets for good practice. One of these is that assessment literacy should be explicitly addressed in the module design and delivery.

 

Assessment literacy is an understanding of all aspects of assessment, so that students are clear about what assessments are and what criteria will be used; and how to apply these to their own work. Students need to be given the chance to make evaluative judgements about the quality of their own work to give them an understanding of what is expected of them and allow them to be self-regulated learners. The ability to evaluate their own work is necessary not only while at university but for lifelong learning. Addressing assessment literacy ensures transparency of assessment processes for both tutors and students. By explicitly addressing assessment criteria, both tutors and students can be confident that the assessments are valid and reliable. For institutions to be transparent, those responsible for assessment will need to reflect on their tacit understandings of the process and in shared communities of practice expose them to scrutiny and together construct shared agreed understandings (Huertas Barros and Vine, 2019).

Building upon the lecture delivered last year on assessment literacy, this workship is conceived as an exercise to demonstrate not only how important it is to have clear and transparent assessment criteria which are a valid reflection of the task they set out to assess, but also how important it is to address and discuss this aspect more explicitly with students. Research by ASKe (Assessment Standards Knowledge exchange, n.d) has shown that students who have had the opportunity to practice applying the assessment criteria to a piece of work and thus have increased assessment literacy improve their performance of the tasks set.

 

The workshop will start with a brief discussion of increasingly prevalent terms and themes in current debates on assessment practices, e.g. ‘assessment literacy’, ‘assessment for learning’, ‘assessment as learning’. Following the introductory discussion, the workshop will model the type of intervention which ASKe suggests all tutors should undertake before setting assessed tasks. Participants will be given a piece of work from a discipline other than translation and asked to suggest criteria to assess it. They will then be given a set of criteria and will compare the criteria with the ones they suggested. The criteria will then be applied to the piece of work and finally the mark and comments given by the tutor will be given and compared to the marks that participant gave.

 

This practical session will aim to demonstrate that students who have a greater assessment literacy and fully understand the criteria and processes involved in assessing a particular piece of work will be better equipped to apply this knowledge to the work that that they or others have completed. The workshop will also suggest ways to integrate assessment literacy into course design.

 

  1. 4) MEETING TO DISCUSS OUR RESEARCH WITH STAFF (1 h)

We would like to discuss our research with your staff in order to explore opportunities to work on a collaborative project (perhaps a comparative study of UK and Poland’s approaches to translation and assessment) or supporting you in conducting a case study in Poland’s approaches to translation and assessment building upon the work we have done in the UK.

We envisage this meeting as follows:

Presentation title: Current trends on MA translation courses in the UK: changing assessment practices on core translation modules

(20 min presentation on our research + 10 min Q &A)

 

Followed by discussion to explore opportunities to work on a collaborative project or offering support to conduct a similar case study in Poland.

 

  1. 5) LUNCH MEETING TO FURTHER DISCUSS COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS WEDNESDAY 14.00 hr                                              

 

 

BIODATAS

Dr Elsa Huertas Barros is a Lecturer in Translation in the School of Humanities at the University of Westminster. Elsa’s main research interests include translator education, translator competence, assessment practices, and student-centred approaches. Elsa has published her work in international journals including The Interpreter and Translator Trainer (ITT), The Journal of Specialised Translation (JoSTrans) and International Journal of Institutional Discourse (IJID). Elsa has also published book chapters in edited volumes such as Translation and Meaning (2016), by Peter Lang, Phraseology in Legal and Institutional Settings: A Corpus-based Interdisciplinary Perspective (2018), by Routledge, and Quality Assurance and Assessment Practices in Translation and Interpreting (2019), by IGI Global. Elsa co-edited the ITT special issue 12(1) on ‘New Perspectives in Assessment in Translator Training’ (2018), and the volume Quality Assurance and Assessment Practices in Translation and Interpreting (2019).

 

Juliet Vine is a Senior Lecturer in Translation and Interpreting in the School of Humanities at the University of Westminster. Juliet's research interests include pedagogical research, with a focus on translator competence, assessment practices, and contrastive rhetoric focusing on Chinese and western rhetorical traditions. Juliet has published book chapters in edited volumes such as Translation and Meaning (2016), by Peter Lang, and Quality Assurance and Assessment Practices in Translation and Interpreting (2019). Juliet has also published her work in international journals including The Interpreter and Translator Trainer (ITT), and co-edited the ITT special issue 12(1) on ‘New Perspectives in Assessment in Translator Training’ (2018).